M.A. Handbook

This M.A. Handbook describes current policies and procedures for students enrolled in the Master of Arts in Anthropology. While this page contains rules and guidelines that are specific to Department of Anthropology and links to regulations that apply to all graduate students as SF State and in the CSU, all students are advised to consult The Grad Guide (PDF) issued and updated by the University's Graduate Division. Students with specific questions should contact the Anthropology graduate coordinator (anthroma@sfsu.edu). Note: The information presented below supersedes previous versions of the M.A. Handbook for Anthropology.

Important contacts

Important SF State policies, forms and deadlines

Topics

Click on the topic to find more information or scroll down to see all information on all topic.

Academic integrity

All students are expected to adhere to a high standard of academic integrity and to the University standards for student conduct.

The minimum sanction for academic dishonesty related to work in a course will be a failure for that examination or piece of assessments. All cases of academic dishonesty will be referred to the department chair, dean of the college, and the judicial affairs officer to determine if any other disciplinary action should be taken. While academic integrity also requires that students submit their own work. While collaboration in studying and discussion outside of class is encouraged, coursework must be the work of one individual unless otherwise specified. Please also see the entry below on Plagiarism.

Advancement to Candidacy (ATC)

What is this? The formal step to candidacy required by the University.

When does it happen? Normally after the second or third semester, and only once you have completed Anth 710 (with a grade of B or better), satisfied the “Language Requirement” (if matriculation before Fall 2017), and completed a minimum of 18 units of classes.

What do you need to do?

  • Meet with the chair of your Thesis / Creative Work Committee and with the graduate coordinator to discuss which classes you will take during your degree and when you will take them.
  • Complete a draft of the Advancement to Candidacy form after you have consulted with the committee chair and the graduate coordinator.
  • Submit completed ATC form to graduate coordinator for review, approval, signature, filing, and submission to Graduate Division.
  • Note that the University uses the ATC to calculate your credits earned (and thus your adherence to the 70%/30% rule). A major aim of the ATC is to direct you to make a clear and achievable plan that will lead to finishing your M.A. in good time. View the full details of University regulations.

For more information about the ATC, see the relevant section in the current SF State Student Grad Guide (PDF).

Advising for Graduate Students

The place to start for advising is with the chair of your Thesis Committee. In determining the classes you should take and when you should take them, and in selecting the set of courses that will contribute best to your Culminating Experience (i.e., your thesis or creative project), your primary source of information is your committee chair. Note that the graduate coordinator is best positioned to ensure that your choice of courses and your schedule to take them works within the department’s and the university’s regulations. The university’s Graduate Division Advising section also has an excellent team to help.

Annual Student Review

What is this? The Department of Anthropology requires graduate students to write a one-to two-page report at the end of each academic year. In the report you provide details and comment on your progress in the previous academic year and your plans for future work in the M.A. program. You submit two electronic copies of your report (pdfs or Word docs): one to the graduate coordinator and one to the chair of your Thesis Committee.

When is the report due? Before 5pm on the first Friday in April.

What must be in the report?

  • Names of your chair and members of your Culminating Experience committee;
  • A list of the classes (course numbers and titles) you have taken and the grades you have recieved during the previous two semesters;
  • A list of the classes (course numbers and titles) that you will enroll in next academic year;

A brief statement concerning progress on your thesis/creative work project. The statement should identify the following:

  • your proposed thesis/creative work topic
  • the research you have done on the thesis so far
  • your estimated time to complete the degree (i.e., do you have a topic, have you done research, how is the research/writing coming, what is your estimated time to completion?).

In addition, please briefly identify the following:

  • the professional meetings (if any) that you have attended during last academic year and plans if and for attending future meetings;
  • papers/presentations (if any) that you have made over the past academic year (e.g., whether in professional meetings, university, community), and plans for future papers and presentations;
  • your plans after completion of the M.A. (e.g., application to Ph.D. program; job applications).

Culminating Experience (Thesis/Creative Project)

What is this?

The University uses the term Culminating Experience (or CE) to refer to your thesis or creative work project. If you are writing a thesis, then you will enroll in Anth 898; if you are making a creative project, then you will enroll in Anth 894. Normally, you will enroll in one of these classes in the final semester of your M.A.. When you complete your ATC form, you must indicate in which semester you plan to take the CE class.

When does this happen?

Officially, you enroll in Anth 898/894 for the semester in which you plan to submit your thesis/project and in which you plan to graduate. In reality, you should have submitted at least a full final draft to the chair of your thesis or project committee before the final semester. You will need the final semester to complete the final editing of your work and to prepare the final formatting, copy-editing and proofreading. These latter tasks take much more time than you may imagine.

Because of this, beginning in the first semester of your M.A., you must work closely with the chair of your Thesis / Project Committee to plan the work that will culminate in your thesis or project. With his or her advice, you will tailor your selection of electives (including, particularly, the use of Anth 899 Independent Study classes) so that you will have completed much of the background and preliminary work before the semester in which you take 898/894. Important note: you may not use work completed for one class (i.e., Anth 899) for another class (i.e., Anth 898/894). Speak with the chair of your Thesis/Project Committee and the graduate coordinator to review this policy and your adherence to it.

What needs to happen?

The department, the graduate division, and the university have strict deadlines by which different stages individual elements of the Thesis/Project must be completed. Many of these fall before the semester in which you plan to enroll in your 898/894. You must schedule your work accordingly, using the University’s guidelines.

The most important stages and thesis-completing deadlines are the following:

  • Completion of the Advancement to Candidacy form;
  • Department approval of the Proposal for your Culminating Experience - that is your Thesis / Project Proposal. Preparing and obtaining approval for your Proposal for your Culminating Experience are not simple or rapid processes. We advise students to make themselves aware of what is required as early in their M.A. career as possible. See full details through the following links: University approval of your Culminating Experience with completed and signed form - see Grad Guide (PDF) for full details and University approval of Human and Animal Protections - IRB and IACUC.
  • Submission of the full first draft of your thesis or user's guide. Normally, students are required to submit a full first draft of their thesis/user’s guide to the chair of their committee early in the semester in which they plan to apply for graduation: for the fall semester, this is September 1st; for the spring semester, this is February 1st. Any exception to these deadlines must be agreed in writing between the chair of the committee and the student before the relevant deadline passes; a copy of that agreement will be sent to the graduate coordinator who will file it in the department’s student’s record. Students must realize that failing to meet these deadlines may jeopardize their abilities to meet University deadlines for format-checks, submission of the thesis/user’s guide, and graduation.

What is my Culminating Experience Committee?

University Policy requires that a culminating experience committee be composed of at least two members who are regular, full-time tenured or tenure-track members of the Anthropology faculty. Emeritus faculty, faculty in the Early Retirement Program (FERP), and regular faculty in a department/program other than Anthropology may serve as third members, but not as chairs or second members. Culminating Experience committees are assigned at the time of matriculation. Students meet with the members of their committee before they submit their Thesis / Project Proposal in order to discuss and agree the roles and responsibilities of each committee member.  Students in the M.A. Program work closely with the chair of their Culminating Experience committee at all times and should meet frequently with him or her to discuss their course work, research interests and progress. Students must have at least one documented meeting with the chair of their Culminating Experience committee each semester. Best practice in these meetings is that the chair takes notes, which he or she circulates to the student and the graduate coordinator soon after the meeting. The department requires each graduate student to prepare an Annual Student Review of their progress in the program.

Students seeking to change committee membership should first meet with the chair of their current committee, and (if necessary) with the graduate coordinator to discuss the rationale for changing. If agreement to the change is reached, then the student must download the Petition for Committee Revision from the Graduate Division's website, complete the form with all required signatures, and then send it to the Graduate Coordinator for processing.

Creative Project Work (Anth 894)

What is this?

For their Culminating Experience, students who are specializing in visual anthropology normally complete a film or other portfolio work. To do so they enroll in Anth 894 in their final semester of their M.A.

What is required?

Students who produce a video as their Creative Work are also required to write a 10- to 15-page User’s Guide accompanying the video. The purpose of the Guide is to help ‘facilitators’ who will screen the film for audiences and lead discussions about it. A User’s Guide should include a one-page outline of key points in the film - just for the facilitator to have as a reminder. It should also include key terms and definitions. For more academically minded facilitators, the Guide also includes reference to about 10 peer-reviewed essays and their contributions to understanding the film. It should include a brief history of the problem to which the film/intervention is directed.

In addition, the Guide should also make suggestions to the facilitator about how the screening intervention might unfold. That is, if the purpose of the film is to address a problem or prejudice believed to dwell in the audience (as is usually the motivation for making videos in this department), then the Guide can identify exact moments in the film that the filmmaker thinks the facilitator should direct audience attention to, encouraging audience discussion about those precise issues. Students are encouraged to make creative additions to these general requirements. For example, Guides have sometimes included sections of the maker’s field notes. Others have included sample questions for the audience.

Curriculum

All classes currently active are listed in the SF State Bulletin

Note that not all classes are offered every term. Check with the graduate coordinator to find out what is offered and in what semester. The department makes every effort to maintain a regular and repeating schedule for classes.

Declassification and Probation

The University has clear rules about what graduate students must do in order to remain in good standing. Of these rules, the most important are the following:

  • That you must maintain an average GPA of 3.00 or above. If you do not, then the University automatically places you on probation;
  • That you must maintain enrollment (if you do not enroll in two consecutive semesters, you will lose your graduate standing, and you will have to re-apply to the program in order to continue your degree);
  • That you make continuous progress towards your degree. The department may place a student on probation if they deem that the student is not making progress towards their degree. Progress towards your degree may include the following: that you complete coursework to deadline; that you attend scheduled meetings with the chair of your committee, the graduate coordinator, and the department chair; that you attend scheduled class meetings; that you complete assessed work to deadline; and that you meet other scheduled requirements and deadlines (e.g., participating in the SF State Showcase for Research and Creative Work; submission of Department Annual Reports).

Students are allowed two semesters on probation. If a student is on probation for a third semester then he or she is subject to disqualification. At that time the student must fill out the Petition for Reinstatement Following Disqualification and the program will decide whether to deny their request to continue in the program or clear them to continue with the program under conditions.

You will find important information about these and other regulations in the Student Grad Guide and at the following links:

Degree Requirements for the M.A. in Anthropology

The M.A. in Anthropology is a 30-unit degree spread over two or three years. While students must maintain a GPA of 3.00 or above, students also must pass the following 15 units of required classes with a grade of B or better:

  • Anth 710 Pro-seminar in Anthropological Theory and Method (3 units)
  • Anth 715 Core Skills: The Craft of Anthropological Writing  (1 unit)
  • Anth 716 Core Skills: The Literature Review (1 unit)
  • Anth 717 Core Skills: The Research Proposal (1 unit)
  • Anth 718 Core Skills: The Grant Proposal (1 unit)
  • Anth 720 Seminar in Visual Anthropology (2 units)
  • Anth 721 Seminar in Archaeology (2 units)
  • Anth 722 Seminar in Biological Anthropology (2 units)
  • Anth 723 Seminar in Cultural Anthropology (2 units)

All students matriculating before Fall 2017 must satisfy the “Language Requirement” by passing a department-organized test in a language relevant to their research/project OR by passing Anth 652 Anthropological Statistics with a grade of B or better. See full details under “Language Exam” below. Students matriculating in Fall 2017 or after that date are not required to satisfy the Language Requirement.

All students must complete one of the 3-unit Culminating Experience classes: either Anth 898 (Thesis) or Anth 894 (Creative Project).

To gain the remaining number of units required, students must take elective classes in the department (or in other SF State departments, provided that permission has been obtained from the student’s chair of his or her Thesis Committee and the graduate coordinator, and pass them with a grade of B or better).

Disability Access

Students with disabilities who need reasonable accommodations are encouraged to contact the Disability Programs and Resource Center (DPRC) early in the semester so that they can facilitate the process of securing accommodations. The DPRC, located in SSB 110, can be reached by telephone at 338-2472 (voice/TTY) or by e-mail at dprc@sfsu.edu.

Fieldwork and Risk Assessment

The Department of Anthropology requires that all M.A. students planning to carry out fieldwork complete the following tasks (and gain approvals) well in advance of the dates of proposed work (note that the University has a firm 45-day pre-fieldwork deadline and some forms require considerable time to complete):

  • Meet with the chair of your Thesis Committee/Advisor to discuss proposed work, to review the value of the work, and the discuss potential safety concerns and steps you will take to minimize risk;
  • Meet with the graduate coordinator in Anthropology to discuss plans for work and steps taken to minimize risk;

In consultation with the graduate coordinator, complete the following forms:

  • Request for Authorization to Travel;
  • Foreign Travel Insurance Packet (FTIP);
  • Release of Liability (use domestic or international form as appropriate);
  • Request to Appoint Volunteer;
  • Request to Travel to High Hazardous County, if necessary (check CSURMA list of countries);
  • Submit forms (signed and dated) to the graduate coordinator, who will submit them to the College and the University on your behalf;

Do not start fieldwork until permissions have been granted and insurance arranged (via SF State).

Forms for students

Almost everything that you want to do (from petitioning to take an Anth 899 Independent Study class to applying to graduate) has a required SF State form. The Graduate Division makes these forms available on its website.

Note that you will need to complete most of the forms online, print them out and then get signatures from faculty or administrators. Do not leave it until it is too late (!) to get signatures.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Can I count units or credits from classes that I took at another university to my SF State M.A.?

A: Yes, though students are required to consult with the Graduate Division and with the graduate coordinator to determine whether or not the credits or units will be accepted. It is important that you go to the official University regulations for further details on academic procedures. There is a limit to the number of units that a student may transfer.

Q: How do I decide what classes to take and when to take them?

A: Students should arrive at SF State with a clear idea of what classes they need to take. In the weeks before they matriculate, students are required to contact the chair of their Thesis Committee and the graduate coordinator in order to discuss what classes are offered in which semesters and what is the best path to take through their degrees.

Q: Can I take classes at other universities and transfer them to my SF State M.A.?

A: Yes, but you must follow the appropriate steps to do so. The first of these steps is to discuss with both the chair of your committee and the graduate coordinator the potential classes that you wish to take. See full details of the evaluations (PDF) and academic procedures.

Q: Do I need to have the graduate coordinator’s approval before I register for courses every semester? Do I need the approval of my Thesis chair to register?

A: No, you do not need their approval. However, it is highly recommended that you consult with both your thesis chair and the graduate coordinator each semester about your progress and particularly about the classes that you plan to take. Each semester, you will meet with the graduate coordinator to review your plan for progress through the degree.

Q: May I take courses outside of the Department of Anthropology?

A: Yes. Students often take classes outside of the department and sometimes outside of the University. It is essential that you discuss such plans with your thesis chair and the graduate coordinator well in advance of enrolling outside the Department of Anthropology.

Q: May I take a leave of absence from the program?

A: Yes. The University grants leaves of absence for students who plan to engage in other learning experiences that improve their ability to complete the degree program.

Q: What is the required length of a Thesis? What are the comparable requirements for a Creative Project?

A: There are no required lengths of theses or creative projects. Students work closely with their thesis / project chairs as they develop their Culminating Experiences.

Q: What are the formatting requirements for a Thesis? What are the comparable requirements for a Creative Project?

A: For the correct formatting of your thesis, you must consult the Graduate Division thesis information. The Graduate Division provides excellent (regularly scheduled) workshops for continuing students and you are strongly advised to attend at least one of these. Some students underestimate the time required for formatting, and it is your best interest to find out ahead of time what is required. Students taking Anth 894 (The Creative Project) must contact their instructor for guidelines.

Q: When should I expect to receive comments on work that I have submitted to my advisor, thesis committee chair, or instructor?

A: Faculty in the Department of Anthropology are required to return (with comments) all work submitted by students within 14 days of receipt.

Q: What do I do if my plan of study changes? Is it possible to switch subfields in the program?

A: It is unusual for a student to shift from one subfield to another after having entered the M.A. program, particularly because the admissions review and subsequent offer of admissions are directly related to your subfield. If you believe that you would like to explore the possibility of changing subfields, you should discuss this with both your thesis chair and the graduate coordinator.

Q: What if I want a different faculty member to be my thesis chair?

A: If, in the course of your work in the M.A., you believe that a different faculty member would significantly benefit your progress and your research, then you should discuss this first with your current chair, with the potential new chair, and then with the graduate coordinator.

Q: What do I do if I want to change my Culminating Experience topic?

A: It depends on how significant a change you suggest. If the change is a minor one (e.g., in the title of the project), then there is little that needs to be done, provided that you have not submitted your Proposal for the Culminating Experience and your Thesis Proposal. Work with your thesis chair to focus your topic. Once the Graduate Division has approved your Proposal for the Culminating Experience, then it is much more difficult to change topics; it is also most often ill-advised, as you will already have completed much of your work towards your original topic and research thesis and project.

Q: May I take required classes pass/fail?

A: Each class has its own grading system. You should check with your instructor.

Q: What is the process for requesting an extension for a course if I haven’t been able to finish all the work?

A: In the unusual case that you are unable to complete all of the assessed work for a class (for example, due to a medical or other emergency), then you should work with the instructor of the class to determine the best way forward. It is important that you know that even if your instructor agrees that you may complete work after the agreed deadline, the department chair and the dean must approve any request for extensions in the completing of assessed work.

Q: Is it possible to petition for a grade change?

A: San Francisco State University policies regarding evaluation of student work are subject to change. You should consult the graduate coordinator and the Graduate Division to apprise yourself of current policy. The current version of the SF State Bulletin also states University policy regarding grading.

Q: What if I can’t get into the classes I need to fulfill my plan of study?

A: It is highly unusual that there will not be space for you in classes on the Department of Anthropology. To avoid this possibility, it is vital that you work closely with your thesis chair and with the graduate coordinator to plan your course of study from beginning to end.

Q: Where can I find resources about writing and formatting for coursework and my thesis?

A: All the details for the Student Writing Handbook for the Anthropology program can be found on this page. Resources for formatting your thesis.

Q: What is the normal length of an M.A. in Anthropology, and how do I ensure that I make satisfactory progress?

A: Normally students finish within two or three academic years, depending on whether or not their undergraduate degree is in Anthropology and whether or not they are writing a Thesis or making a Creative Project. In all classes, students are required to make progress towards their degree (see related section of this handbook for details). An excellent way to ensure that you are making satisfactory progress is to meet at least once a semester with your thesis chair and with the graduate coordinator.

Funding, grants and scholarships

The University’s centralized system to help you find funding is called Academic Works. The system provides a searchable database of campus and external scholarships, and allows current and prospective students to apply for campus scholarships online. The system also automatically matches students to campus scholarships they may be eligible for and presents students with recommended scholarships they should consider. In addition, Academic Works allows students to review scholarship requirements and accept scholarship awards online.

The Department of Anthropology awards the following two annual prizes:

  • The Jay Young Award for Excellence
  • The Kiana Dressendorfer Award

Both the Jay Young and the Dressendorfer awards are made in the spring term. Full details and deadlines are distributed each March.

The Department of Anthropology is part of the College of Liberal and Creative Arts (CLA) and the College has its own awards, grants and prizes. Students should consult the LCA website for possible opportunities.

The Division of Graduate Studies provides more information about how students can find support to fund their M.A. Individual award opportunities may be available at the time students make their applications to the M.A. (e.g., Provost Scholar Award).

General Plan for M.A. in Anthropology for Full-time Students

Academic Year One

Complete prerequisite classes (if any)

Complete core classes

  • Pro-Seminar in Anthropology (Anth 710)
  • Core Skills classes (Anth 715, 716, 717, 718)
  • Subject-specific graduate seminars (Anth 720, 721, 722, 723)
  • Complete “Language Requirement” (only if a student matriculated before Fall 2017)
  • Submit Advancement to Candidacy form

Academic Years Two and Three

Note: Individual areas of specialism (Archaeology, Biological Anthropology, Cultural Anthropology, Visual Anthropology) have suggested lists of electives to take. Contact the Chair of your Thesis Committee for details.

Graduate Division

What is it?

The Graduate Division is the administrative unit at SF State that manages all matters related to your graduate experience, from your application to your graduation. Located on the second floor of the Administration Building, the Graduate Division has a staff of experts who are in the best position to advise you on regulations and policies of the University and the CSU.

Who to contact at the Graduate Division?

Important contacts at the Graduate Division are the Continuing Students’ advisors who have the most up-to-date information about your status in the degree. Along with the department’s graduate coordinator, the Continuing Students’ advisors can answer all procedural and policy questions. In addition, these advisers perform the required format check on your thesis if your CE is Anth 898, and they process all paperwork for your Advancement to Candidacy, all petitions for waivers of regulations, your application for graduation and many other essential milestones. They are important allies to have on your side, and they coordinate regular workshops for students at all stages of their M.A. careers. Students who seek out their advice early and often will have the fewest problems and delays (and nasty surprises) as they move towards completing their degrees.

Graduation

To successfully graduate with an M.A. in Anthropology at SF State, you will need to meet a series of important deadlines and follow an explicit set of steps through the phases of your degree. Deadlines are set by the University and are non-negotiable, and you will need to plan your path to graduation from as early as possible in your M.A. career. Use the following link to obtain the current deadlines and follow them.

Grievances

The University has a formal procedure for students to make grievances.

In almost every instance, the best way to question a decision or make a complaint is to start with the instructor, staff member or other person involved. If you are not satisfied at that level, or if you feel that it is not appropriate for you to raise the issue with that person, then the next person to speak with is the graduate coordinator. If you are not satisfied with the outcome of your discussion with the graduate coordinator or if you feel that there is a reason not to contact the graduate coordinator, then you should contact the chair of the department. If you are not satisfied at that level, then you should take your concern to the Office of the Dean of the College of Creative and Liberal Arts where you can meet with one of the associate deans or the dean himself. Only when all of these steps have been exhausted should you raise your concern with the Dean of the Graduate Division, and only if you still are not satisfied with the responses and actions provided should you take your complaint further up the administrative tree.

Note that the sequence outlined here is the best way to file a complaint, and that students who do not address the local, lower-level authorities (graduate coordinator, department chair, etc.) will find that the responses of university officials at higher levels will be to refer you back down to the beginning of the sequence.

Human and Animal Protection

See Research permission and ethical approval.

Independent Study (Anth 899)

What is it?

Anth 899 Independent Study is a 1-, 2-, or 3-unit class in which students work closely with a faculty member on an area in which the faculty has particular expertise. Most often, students take Anth 899s in topics that are closely related to the subject of their Culminating Experiences.

How do you set up an Anth 899 class?

There is a clear (and at first sight unnecessarily long) set of steps to take to set up an 899. The most important points to note are that you must have a GPA of 3.25 to be eligible to take an 899, that you must complete a formal Petition that requires the approval of the graduate coordinator, the department chair, and the Dean’s Office, that you cannot take more than two 899s in your M.A. career, and that you must petition to take an 899 before the end of the preceding semester. The Petition for an 899 is available on line (go to student forms on the Graduate Division website).

Students who want to petition to take an 899 must follow the following steps (you will not be able to enroll in Anth 899 unless each of these steps are completed):

  • at least two weeks before the end of the preceding term, contact the relevant faculty member about the possibility of doing an 899;
  • confirm with the faculty member that you have the required minimum GPA minimum for doing an 899 (i.e., 3.25);
  • confirm with the faculty member or graduate coordinator that you have not already completed two 899s;
  • discuss with faculty member and agree a topic for the 899 and agree how you will complete the petition form: specific title, SLOs, meeting schedule, work to be completed with dates, lengths/dimensions of work, percentage of final grade (use sample Petition, link);
  • complete a draft Petition with all required information (including your current GPA), and submit it to the faculty member and to the graduate coordinator for comment and approval. Note that the title of your 899 as listed on the Petition will be printed on your transcript; be specific (“Independent Study” is not appropriate or detailed enough). Also, note that the text in Box III must include clearly defined assessed work (i.e., a 7500-word essay);
  • once the text of the Petition has been approved by the chair of your committee and the graduate coordinator, print out the Petition and get your committee chair and the graduate coordinator to sign a hard copy of the Petition;
  • print out a copy of your current unofficial transcript showing your GPA;
  • send to the graduate coordinator the hard copy of the signed petition and of your transcript;
  • the graduate coordinator will submit the completed Petition to the Dean’s Office for approval, and the dean will send the Petition (if approved) to the Registrar’s Office;
  • at the beginning of the term in which you plan to enroll in the 899, ask the graduate coordinator for an “add” number for the 899;
  • register for and enroll in Anth 899; and
  • complete 899, submit work to faculty member who will submit the grade for your work.

Students should contact the graduate coordinator and ask for a sample Petition to use while preparing their Petitions (note the language used, the work required, and the schedule of work).

Institutional Review Board (IRB)

See Research Permissions and Ethical Approval.

Language Requirement

What is it?

For students matriculating before fall 2017, the Language Requirement is one of the core requirements of the M.A. degree in Anthropology. The requirement is satisfied either by passing a department coordinated sight-exam in a language closely related to your research, or by passing Anth 652 Anthropological Statistics with a grade of B or better. Note: Students matriculating form fall 2017 are not subject to the Langauge Requirement.

When does a student satisfy the Requirement?

Normally, students satisfy the Language Requirement before the end of the first academic year.

How does a student satisfy the Requirement if they opt not to do so by taking Anth 652?

Students satisfy the requirement by passing a 90-minute sight translation test of one peer-reviewed journal article or book chapter in a language relevant to their thesis or project work. In preparation for the exam, a student must meet with the chair of their committee to select ten peer-reviewed journal articles or book chapters in their chosen language. The student then studies those articles or chapters on their own. Before the end of the second term of their enrolment, the committee chair selects one of the articles or chapter and oversees a sight exam during which the student to translates as much as possible in a 90-minute exam, administered in the Department Office. Students may use a hard-copy dictionary during the exam.

For students who matriculated before Fall 2017, it is possible to apply for a Waiver of Graduation Program Regulations (use this link to find the form) to waive the need to satisfy the Language Requirement. Get the form, complete it, note who needs to sign it, and let the graduate coordinator know if you have any questions. If you plan to apply to waive the Language Requirement, then I strongly recommend that you do so well in advance of submitting your application to graduate.

The M.A. Expo (Department-level requirement)

What is it?

The M.A. Expo is an Anthropology event that takes place in the last week of each semester. Partly social, partly academic, the Expo is an opportunity for Anthropology graduate students to present their in-progress Thesis or Creative Project work to their peers and to faculty and lecturers. At the Expo two or three students present short (10-minute) Power Point presentations and then lead a 20-minute Q & A about their research.

The Anthropology Graduate Student Committee organizes the Expo, and invites volunteers to present their work. All students should take advantage of this chance to talk about their work, the successes that they have had, and the challenges that they may be facing. Each Expo ends with a meal. Faculty and visitors are welcome to attend.

When does it happen?

Normally in the evening of the penultimate or last Thursday of the semester.

Paths to graduation

Depending on your specialist area (archaeology, bioarchaeology, cultural anthropology, or visual anthropology), you will follow a particular route through your M.A. All specialisms follow the same path in the first year of enrollment. In all cases, is it best practice to speak with the chair of your Thesis Committe about specific classes you should take and when you should take them. If you have quetions about the general structure of the M.A. or the shared skills or seminar classes, then you should speak with the graduate coordinator.

Archaeology path

Semester 1

  • Anth 710: Proseminar in Anthropological Theory and Method (3 units)
  • Anth 715: Research Skills: Craft of Anthropological Writing (1 unit)
  • Anth 716: Research Skills: The Literature Review (1 unit)
  • Anth 722: Seminar in Biological Anthropology (2 units)
  • Anth 723: Seminar in Problems in Cultural Anthropology (2 units)

Semester 2

  • Anth 717: Research Skills: The Research Proposal (1 unit)
  • Anth 715: Research Skills: The Grant Proposal (1 unit)
  • Anth 722: Seminar in Visual Anthropology (2 units)
  • Anth 723: Seminar in Archaeological Problems (2 units)
  • Elective: student selected (3 units)

Semester 3

  • Anth 652: Anthropological Statistics (4 units)
  • Anth 899: Independent Study (3 units)
  • Anth 899: Independent Study (3 units)

Semester 4

  • Anth 898: Thesis (3 units)

Total units for archaeology path: 30

Bioarchaeology path

Semester 1

  • Anth 710: Proseminar in Anthropological Theory and Method (3 unit)
  • Anth 715: Research Skills: Craft of Anthropological Writing (1 unit)
  • Anth 716: Research Skills: The Literature Review (1 unit)
  • Anth 722: Seminar in Biological Anthropology (2 units)
  • Anth 723: Seminar in Problems in Cultural Anthropology (2 units)

Semester 2

  • Anth 717: Research Skills: The Research Proposal (1 unit)
  • Anth 715: Research Skills: The Grant Proposal (1 unit)
  • Anth 722: Seminar in Visual Anthropology (2 units)
  • Anth 723: Seminar in Archaeological Problems (2 units)
  • Elective: student selected (3 units)

Semester 3

  • Anth 652: Anthropological Statistics (4 units)
  • Anth 730: Human Osteology Practicum (4 units)
  • Elective: student selected (3 units)

Semester 4

  • Anth 898: Thesis (3 units)

     AND

  • Anth 545: Bioarchaeology (3 units)

    OR

  • Anth 735: Palaeopathology (3 units)

Total units for bioarchaeology path: 32

Cultural Anthropology path

Semester 1

  • Anth 710: Proseminar in Anthropological Theory and Method (3 unit)
  • Anth 715: Research Skills: Craft of Anthropological Writing (1 unit)
  • Anth 716: Research Skills: The Literature Review (1 unit)
  • Anth 722: Seminar in Biological Anthropology (2 units)
  • Anth 723: Seminar in Problems in Cultural Anthropology (2 units)

Semester 2

  • Anth 717: Research Skills: The Research Proposal (1 unit)
  • Anth 715: Research Skills: The Grant Proposal (1 unit)
  • Anth 722: Seminar in Visual Anthropology (2 units)
  • Anth 723: Seminar in Archaeological Problems (2 units)
  • Elective: student selected (3 units)

Semester 3

  • Anth 630: Medical Anthroology (3 units)
  • Anth 899: Independent Study (3 units)
  • Elective: student selected (3 units)

Semester 4

  • Anth 898: Thesis (3 units)

Total units for cultural anthrology path: 30

Visual Anthropology (fixed-image) path

Semester 1

  • Anth 710: Proseminar in Anthropological Theory and Method (3 unit)
  • Anth 715: Research Skills: Craft of Anthropological Writing (1 unit)
  • Anth 716: Research Skills: The Literature Review (1 unit)
  • Anth 722: Seminar in Biological Anthropology (2 units)
  • Anth 723: Seminar in Problems in Cultural Anthropology (2 units)

Semester 2

  • Anth 717: Research Skills: The Research Proposal (1 unit)
  • Anth 715: Research Skills: The Grant Proposal (1 unit)
  • Anth 722: Seminar in Visual Anthropology (general) (2 units)
  • Anth 723: Seminar in Archaeological Problems (2 units)
  • Anth 755: Seminar in Visual Anthropology (moving-image) (3 units)

Semester 3

  • Anth 750: Seminar in Visual Anthropology (fixed-image) (3 units)
  • Anth 899: Independent Study (3 units)
  • Elective: student selected (3 units)

Semester 4

  • Anth 898: Thesis (3 units)

Total units for archaeology path: 30

Visual Anthropology (video-production) path

Students are advised to contact Professor Biella.

Plagiarism

The University have clear rules about plagiarism. View the plagiarism policies.

Plagiarism is a form of cheating or fraud; it occurs when a student misrepresents the work of another as his or her own. Plagiarism may consist of using the ideas, sentences, paragraphs, or the whole text of another without appropriate acknowledgment, but it also includes employing or allowing another person to write or substantially alter work that a student then submits as his or her own. In addition, it includes collaborating on any assessed work that a student then submits as his or her own. Collaboration in studying and discussion of the class topics is encouraged outside of class, but all exams and assignments must be the work of one individual unless otherwise specified.

Any assignment found to be plagiarized will be given an "F" grade. All instances of plagiarism in the College of Humanities will be reported to the Dean of the College, and may be reported to the University Judicial Affairs Officer for further action. All students must review the College’s position on plagiarism and must understand the consequences of committing plagiarism.

Your Instructors will use a plagiarism detection service called www.turnitin.com. At this site, professors can check any electronically submitted text for plagiarism against a variety of sources including the Internet and previously turned in papers for their own class or any other class worldwide where the professor has access to this service.

Department of Anthropology Paper Reuse Policy

It is the policy of the Department of Anthropology that a student may not submit a paper, essay, film, or other academic work that is the same or substantially the same as work submitted for credit in another course, unless prior permission is given by the instructor. Under this policy, “the same” or “substantially the same” are defined in the same manner as plagiarism of another individual’s work. Violation of this policy is considered an act of academic misconduct, and the faculty member to whom the paper is submitted may reduce the grade or not give credit for any recycled or duplicated assignments. 

Students are reminded that they may not submit any work that has been submitted for one credit-bearing class for another credit-bearing class. This is particularly relevant to the distinction of work completed for Anth 899s (Independent Studies) and Ant 894 (Creative Projects) and Anth 898 (Theses). Students unsure of this policy are required to meet with the Graduate coordinator to ensure comprehension of and adherence to the plagiarism policy.

Prerequisites for Students Without a B.A./B.Sc. in Anthropology

The department requires that students entering the M.A .in Anthropology with a B.A. or B.Sc. in a subject other than Anthropology to take the following classes and pass them with grades of 'B' or better:

  • Anth 100 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
  • Anth 110 Introduction to Archaeology
  • Anth 300 Foundations of Cultural Anthropology

Students who have taken undergraduate classes at other institutions in archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology should send their undergraduate transcript to the graduate coordinator to determine if any of the three pre-requisites have already been satisfied.

Note that until a student satisfies the Anth 100 requirement, he or she is not allowed to take any other Biological Anthropology classes in the department. The same applies to Anth 110 for Archaeology classes, and to Anth 300 for Cultural Anthropology classes.

Probation

See Declassification and probation.

References for applications

Students often require letters of support for applications to Ph.D. programs and to funding opportunities. Almost without exception, faculty are happy and willing to write letters of reference provided that the following advice is followed:

  • always ask the potential referee if he or she is willing to support your application before you include his or her name in an application;
  • always give the referee adequate time to complete the letter. Strong letters require significant effort and time. Two weeks is an absolute minimum; four weeks is better;
  • be realistic when you decide who to ask to write in support. The most successful letters will come from instructors who know well your work and your abilities and who will be able to write in specific detail about your essays, project work, or other output. Asking the department chair or graduate coordinator to write for you when they only taught you in one large class or, worse, never taught you, is next to useless;
  • send your referee full details about the target of your application: a copy of your statement of application, your transcript, any online link for submission of the letter, and a clear statement of the deadline by which the letter is required. Also, many referees welcome student comment on particular skills or experiences that the student has; give your referee something to write about. Give them details;
  • waive your right to see the reference. Referees want to write confidently and in confidence about your abilities and experiences. It is never a good sign to refuse to waive confidentiality. If you are not sure that the referee will write strongly about you, then you should not have selected them to write for you;
  • realize that the best references will come from instructors who know you, your abilities, and your skills best. Do not choose a referee because of their position; choose one because of their knowledge of you;
  • follow up by sending your referee an email two or three days before your reference is due;
  • report back to your referee after you have heard the result of your application, even if you were not successful (this is the time to get advice for future applications).

Research Permissions and Ethical Approval

Human and Animal Protection

What is this?

Every M.A. student completing a Culminating Experience is subject to review by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). SF State’s Human and Animal Protections support the IRB and the IACUC. When you submit your Thesis Proposal, you are required to show that you have obtained approval from one of these institutions or that you have been exempted.

What do you need to know and do?

You will need to work with the chair of your Thesis Committee in the first instance on this. Use the information available online.

Most research permissions proposals can be submitted online, though all proposals take considerable time and effort and cannot be completed at the last minute. Proposals should be part of your research plan from the beginning of your work. The link above provides information and further resources for you to use to determine if your work requires review and approval.

Institutional Review Board (IRB)

If any part of your graduate research involves human or animal subjects, you will need to determine whether you need ethical approval from the University’s Institutional Review Board (IRB) in advance of beginning data collection.

The IRB for San Francisco State University is charged with reviewing all research involving research volunteers to ensure that their rights are protected according to the federal regulations stated in 45 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 46 and 21 CFR Parts 50 and 56 (FDA policy). For more details regarding IRB submissions and review, see the website of the University’s Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

Ethical approval for bioarchaeology

NAGPRA collections: If your research involves NAGPRA collections (human remains or NAGPRA associated cultural material) you must provide specific documentation that you have obtained the permission of the institution or museum that houses the material and that all NAGPRA procedures have been followed including appropriate contact with Native American representatives.  Simply stating that you have made these contacts is not sufficient.  You must include copies of the permission letters from the appropriate institution(s) and/or Native American representatives. View further information regarding NAGPRA regulations.

View a list of relevant state laws and codes.

Research involving human remains

Note that IRB approval is not needed for human skeletal remains, whether Native American or not. The use of cadavers, skeletal remains or medical/anatomical tissue specimens are not considered to be “human subjects/human research.” This is covered by Title 45 Part 46 of the Code of Federal Regulations regarding the protection of human subjects stating that the code applies only to “living subjects” and where 46.101(b) specifically exempts “research involving collection or study of existing data, documents, records, or pathological or diagnostic specimens".

There is only one case where bioarchaeology students might need IRB approval under California state regulation. Section 102231–102232 of the CA Health and Safety Codes states that: "IRB review is required for research using California-produced death data files containing personal identifying information (i.e., state issued death certificates and indices)". Some recent anatomical or forensic collections may contain personally identifying information, but it would be unusual for students to need to access that information. If they did, they would need to have IRB approval.

Ethical approval for films

With only one exception, SF State’s IRB treats films produced as Creative Works in the Department of Anthropology as exempt. This IRB decision is based on NIH’s definition of two key terms, research and oral history. Anthropological films are considered to fall under the latter category, which is exempt. To be cautious, students are invited to submit short descriptions of their films to the IRB for preliminary evaluation. In 18 years, however, only one film has been judged appropriate for IRB overview.

Risk assessment

See above under Fieldwork and risk assessment.

Routes Through the M.A. in Anthropology Degree

Depending on the subject of your undergraduate degree, you will normally follow one of two general routes though the degree. Note: students matriculating prior to Fall 2017 are advised to contact the graduate coordinator to discuss the old "Language Requirement" and the best way for them to satisfy that requirement.

Route 1: Anthropology BA/BS

Students matriculating in the Fall Semester with a B./B.S. in Anthropology should follow this route.

First Fall (M.A. units earned: 9 [9 total)])

  • Anth 710 Proseminar in Anthropological Theory and Method (3 units)
  • Anth 715 The Craft of Anthropological Writing (1 unit)
  • Anth 716 The Literature Review (1 unit)
  • Anth 722 Seminar in Biological Anthropology (2 units)
  • Anth 723 Seminar in Cultural Anthropology (2 units)

First Spring (M..A units earned: 9 [18 total)])

  • Anth 717 The Research Proposal (1 unit)
  • Anth 718 The Grant Proposal (1 unit)
  • Anth 720 Seminar in Visual Anthropology (2 units)
  • Anth 721 Seminar in Archaeology (2 units)
  • Elective: Student selected (3 units)

Second Fall (M.A. units earned: 9 [27 total])

  • Elective: Student selected (3 units)
  • Elective: Student selected (3 units)
  • Elective: Student selected (3 units)

Second Spring (M.A. units earned: 3 [30 total])

  • Anth 898/894 Master's Thesis / Creative Work Project (3 units)

Route 2: Non-Anthropological B.A./B.S.

Students matriculating in the Fall Semester with a B./B.S. in Anthropology should follow this route.

First Fall (M.A. units earned: 0 [0 total])

  • Anth 100 Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3 units)
  • Anth 110 Introduction to Archaeology (3 units)
  • Anth 300 Foundations of Anthropology (3 units)

First Spring (M.A. units earned: 9 [9 total])

  • Anth 717 The Research Proposal (1 unit)
  • Anth 718 The Grant Proposal (1 unit)
  • Anth 720 Seminar in Visual Anthropology (2 units)
  • Anth 721 Seminar in Archaeology (2 units)
  • Elective: Student selected (3 units)

Second Fall (M.A. units earned: 9 [18 total])

  • Anth 710 Proseminar in Anthropological Theory and Method (3 units)
  • Anth 715 The Craft of Anthropological Writing (1 unit)
  • Anth 716 The Literature Review (1 unit)
  • Anth 722 Seminar in Biological Anthropology (2 units)
  • Anth 723 Seminar in Cultural Anthropology (2 units)

Second Spring (M.A. units earned: 9 [27 total])

  • Elective: Student selected (3 units)
  • Elective: Student selected (3 units)
  • Elective: Student selected (3 units)

Third Fall (M.A. units earned: 3 [30 total])

  • Anth 898/894 Master's Thesis / Creative Work Project (3 units)

Notes

Electives

A student takes graduate elective classes (numbered 700 and above) selected from those offered in the Department of Anthropology. If a student wishes to take graduate elective classes from other departments at SF State, they may do so with pre-approval by the chair of his or her Thesis Committee in consulation with the graduate coordinator. With approval, students may take upper division undergraduate classes in Anthropology with the following condition: the percentage of undergraduate units must not exceed 30% of all units taken (prerequisite or other required classes excepted).

Customization of routes

Depending on pre-requisities already completed, availability of electives (and other classes), or other factors, it is possible for a student to customize her or his route, provided that changes do not delay the completion of their degree, and provided they have the approval of the chair of their Thesis Committee in consulation with the graduate coordinator.

Electives in Anthropology (700-level)

  • Anth 730 Human Osteology (3 units)
  • Anth 731 Fossil Humans Practicum (3 units)
  • Anth 735 Palaeopathology (3 units)
  • Anth 750 Seminar in Visual Anthropology: Fixed Image (3 units)
  • Anth 755 Seminar in Visual Anthropology: Moving Image (3 units)
  • Anth 899 Independent Study (1, 2 or 3 units) - may be taken twice.

In order to finalize her or his choice of classes, each student is required to speak with the chair of her or his Thesis Commitee (contac the graduate coordinator if you are unsure who is your commitee chair) no later than two weeks before the first day of classes in her or his first term of enrolment.

Seventy / Thirty Rule (70% / 30%)

As calculated from your completed Advancement to Candidacy form, at least 70% of your classes must be of graduate level (i.e., 700-level or above). The remaining 30% of your classes may be graduate classes, the graduate sections of a paired class, or upper division undergraduate courses. No more than 20% of your classes may come from the graduate sections of paired classes. You may not include any lower division classes on your ATC. We strongly recommend that you discuss the balance of your classes first with the chair of your Thesis (who will guide you and your course selection) and then with the graduate coordinator (who will help with rules and regulations). View the full university regulations.

Showcase for Research and Creative Works (University)

What and when is this?

Each spring the University sponsors a public fair where graduate students present their thesis or creative projects. All Anthropology M.A. students are required to participate in the Showcase in their second or third year.  View the full details about the showcase.

Participation in the Showcase requires a formal (though not complicated) application which the Graduate Division distributes early in the spring semester and which the graduate coordinator will forward to all Anthropology M.A. students.

The Showcase is part academic and part social. All students are invited to the banquet at the end of the event. Anthropology students should invite the chairs of their committees to the Showcase and to the banquet.

Thesis (Anth 898) / Creative Project  (Anth 894)

Students will not be able to enroll in Anth 898 or Anth 894 until the Graduate Division has approved their Culminating Experience form, and the Graduate Division will not do so until the department has approved the Thesis Proposal.

Preparation and submission

Although students only enroll in their Anth 898 or Anth 894 class for one semester (the final semester of enrolment), they will have devoted a significant amount of time and effort to their Culminating Experience before their term, either through electives or through Anth 899 classes. In fact, work on the Thesis or Creative Project begins with the student’s application and consultation with potential committee chairs, and continues through the Core Skills classes (especially Anth 716 Literature Review and Anth 717 Research Design), and often through Anth 899 classes (Independent Study).

The department strongly advises students to meet regularly with their committee chairs from the beginning of their M.A. careers to discuss their Culminating Experiences.

Format Check: All students must satisfy the Graduate Division’s Format Check of the written portion of their Culminating Experiences. The Graduate Division will not approve a Culminating Experience until it has passed their Format Check. Students must be aware of deadlines for getting the Format Check completed (https://grad.sfsu.edu/content/student-deadlines), and the Department advises students to make contact with the Graduate Division’s Continuing Students’ Advisors as early as they can. Students should attend the Division’s Continuing Students’ Workshops.

Assessment: All theses are assessed using a standard Anthropology Rubric (link), and students will benefit from reviewing the rubric as early as possible. Each Thesis Chair will have his or her own methods, schedules, and expectations for working with students to read, and critique drafts of Culminating Experience work. No Thesis Chair works well (if at all) when students present drafts with little lead-time, or when students ignore suggestions, advice, and critique.

Grace semester: If a student enrolls in Anth 898 or Anth 894 and is unable to complete the Culminating Experience before the end of the relevant semester, then it may be possible for the Department to grant a “grace semester” during which the student will finish the thesis or project. Note that grace semesters are not automatic. To be granted a grace semester, the student must have shown clear and explicit (often written) progress towards the completion of the Culminating Experience during semester of enrolment. There is no possibility for repeating or extending a grace semester.  When a grace semester is granted, a grade of Report in Progress (RP) is entered into the student’s transcript. Once the Culminating Experience is satisfactorily completed, the Thesis Chair is responsible for submitting a grade change from RP to Credit.

Thesis/Creative Project (CE) Committee (chair, First and Second Readers)

By the time you matriculate in the M.A. program, you will have been assigned (or better, agreed on) a chair for your Thesis Committee. The chair is the main advisor for your focused learning and research or creative work. Each faculty member has his or her own procedures for selecting Second and (if necessary) Third Readers.

Usually, the formal selection of the membership of your committee happens when a student submits his or her Culminating Experience form as the student completes and gains approval for the Thesis Proposal. At a date no later than the submission of their Thesis Proposals, students will meet with the members of their committee in order to discuss and agree the roles and responsibilites of each member.

When students meet with committee chairs or readers, it is good practice to take notes and then to circulate those notes to all present, asking for corrections and comments. Also good practice is to commit to writing any agreements about work to be completed, deadlines, and similar outcomes from meetings.

The power (and responsibility) to change the membership of the committee (and of the chair, if necessary) rests with the student. A faculty member cannot opt out of their role as chair or reader. If a student believes that a change is necessary, it is advisable that he or she discusses this with the graduate coordinator or, if more appropriate, with the department chair. The University follows a set procedure for changing membership of Thesis Committees; students are advised to download the relevant form (Petition for Committee Revision) from the Graduate Division’s website.

Students are advised to read the University’s policies on Culminating Experience Committee.

Thesis Proposal

What is it?

The Thesis Proposal, or in the University's language, the Proposal for Culminating Experience (PCE), is a required step in every M.A. student’s progress, requires significant work by the student, and requires the approval of the student’s Thesis / Project Committee, the graduate coordinaton, and of the Graduate Division.

When does it have to be submitted and approved?

Students must have their Thesis Proposal approved by their committee and graduate coordinator and then by the Graduate Division before they are allowed to enroll in Anth 898 (Thesis) or Anth 894 (Creative Project). The Graduate Division has a firm deadline for the submission of Proposals, and (at the latest) it is always in the semester preceding the semester in which the Anth 898 or Anth 894 class is taken.

What must be submitted?

After the student has obtained the informal approval of their written Thesis / Project Proposal by the chair of the Thesis / Project Committee (and any Second or Third Reader, if required), he or she should send a completed draft of the University’s Culminating Experience form to the graduate coordinator. With the Coordinator’s approval, the student should send the final copy of their Proposal to their Thesis Chairs with the following two forms completed and signed: Anthropology Department’s  M.A. Thesis Proposal Approval Page (ask the Graduate Coordinator for this); and the University’s Proposal for Culminating Experience Form (PDF).

Note: starting with the Spring 2018 semester, MA Anthropology students are no longer required to complete and submit the Anthropology Department’s M.A. Thesis Proposal Approval Page.

Once the student has obtained the required signatures, then she or he should hand the hard copies of these forms to the graduate coordinator who will file the Department Approval Page and the copy of the Thesis Proposal itself in the Anthropology files. The graduate coordinator will then submit the University’s Culminating Experience Form to the Graduate Division. The Graduate Division will review the form and then either send it back to the student and the graduate coordinator (who will work together to correct any errors or add requested information) or sign off on the form and send both the student and the department a copy of the signed form.

What must the Proposal contain?

The following components are required of your thesis proposal; student must use the headings indicated here.

A 250-word abstract that summarizes your research proposal and includes the following:

  • a clearly defined research question;
  • a statement of why this research is relevant to the discipline/sub-discipline;
  • a statement on how you will examine this research question; and
  • a summary of your expected results.

An introduction that includes the following statements:

  • your major research goals and why are they important;
  • the specific areas/sites/materials/ or your research;
  • the relevance of this inquiry to the broader discipline of anthropology; and
  • if relevant, any hypotheses and how you will test them.

A background section that does the following:

  • outlines the theoretical framework of your research;
  • describes the information or data you will bring to bear on your research problem;
  • briefly reviews the literature relevant to your inquiry; and
  • discusses previous research on your topic and its impact/connection to your research.

A methods section in which you do the following:

  • describe your methodology for data collection and analysis.
  • describe the type of data/observations/texts will you use to answer your research questions or test your hypotheses; and
  • outline your general research methodology for data collection.

If your research involves NAGPRA collections (human remains or NAGPRA-associated cultural material), please provide copies of the documentation from the institution or museum that houses the material that permits you to complete the proposed work. Provide a statement that NAGPRA procedures have been followed including appropriate contact with Native American representatives. Include copies of permission letters from the appropriate institution(s) and/or Native American representatives.

If your research requires IRB approval, please attach copies of that approval.

If your research is exempt from IRB approval, please attach copies of that exemption.

An expected results section in which you outlines the following:

  • what do you expect to find as a result of your research?;
  • what are some other possible results that you do not expect?;
  • a description of any preliminary results or pilot studies that you have conducted.

A schedule in which you do the following:

  • describe what you have accomplished to date;
  • give a dated schedule of what remains to be completed;
  • provide a clear (dated) schedule for field work/data collection;
  • provide a clear (dated) schedule for data analysis;
  • provide a clear (dated) date for the completion of your thesis/project/creative work, taking account of University deadlines for submission of text for formatting.
  • include a detailed budget (travel costs, duplication, etc.).

A list of the members of your Thesis Committee.

Title IX

SF State maintains a policy of nondiscrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex/gender, sexual orientation, religion, and age. Anyone who feels they have experienced discrimination is encouraged to speak with a faculty member, with the department chair, or with a University Harassment Officer so the situation can be addressed. Conversations will remain confidential at the request of the student. All students should feel comfortable and welcome in the SF State community.

SF State fosters a campus free of sexual violence including sexual harassment, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and/or any form of sex or gender discrimination. If you, as an SF State student, disclose a personal experience of sexual violence to a faculty member, the faculty member is required to notify the Dean of Students. To disclose any such violence confidentially, contact:

The SAFE Place - (415) 338-2208

Counseling and Psychological Services Center - (415) 338-2208

View more information on your rights and available resources.

Travel

See above under Fieldwork and risk assessment.